October 5, 2016

How to Make a Simple BYU Shirt


So, if you've been reading this blog for a while you know I Love making BYU shirts for my kids.  



Usually my go-to way of making shirts is Freezer paper and Fabric paint-- which I love to do.  It's super easy and  looks great. It just requires a lot of time-- for drying. 

A couple weeks  ago it was time again for new BYU shirts for the ever-growing kids, but this time I decided to incorporate my favorite outlet-- Sewing! 

 This way of making shirts look really great and Bonus you don't have to wait for paint to dry so it's really quick!

Here's how to make your own:

MATERIALS NEEDED:
1. Heat 'n Bond adhesive
2. Print out of Y logo
3.  Fabric, for background and Y
4. Iron
5. Sewing notions
6. Blue T-shirts. (I usually grab cheap ones and stock up)

STEP ONE: Gather materials.
I used ribbing fabric for the white which looks great.

STEP TWO:  Cut out fabric and Heat 'n Bond paper to size of Y's. 
Trace the ovals and Ys onto the smooth side of the Heat 'N Bond paper. 
ATTENTION: Make sure your Y is backwards when tracing. 
This will ensure it's the right direction when you're all done.

STEP THREE: Iron bumpy side of heat 'n bond onto the wrong side of each  fabric.

STEP FOUR: Once all ironed, cut each oval and Y out.
Peal off backing of ovals.


STEP FIVE: Iron oval in place on shirt. 
Remove Y backing paper and iron white Y in place on the oval.

STEP SIX: To hold everything in place stitch following the edges of the Y and the oval.
Make sure to pick coordinating thread.

 All done and ready to wear!



Ready to go and support those Cougars!

September 26, 2016

Designing With the Building Block Dress

It was my girl's birthday a few days ago.  About a month ago I asked her if she'd be interested in designing her own dress and I would make it for her.

  I told her she could draw whatever she liked and I would sew it.

With the tools the building block dress book offers, this really is an option.

Here's the dress she drew. I was worried about mixing a chevron print with polka-dots.  But a quick trip to Jo-Anns and I found two fabrics that worked out really well. 


And here we are!
The changes I made from the original building block dress really weren't that much.

I added piping to the bottom of the bodice.


I took two inches off the bodice and added about 4 inches to the bottom of the skirt.


I added lengthened the sleeves, since she designed a 3/4 sleeve.  
She wanted the sleeves to come just past the elbow.



I added a lining to just the skirt so it would be more bouncy.


And that's her dress!


She loved it!  She thought it was so fun to see the dress that she designed come to life.





This darling dress really encourages skipping. 


She just looks so darling in her new-- self-designed building block dress.


September 21, 2016

Building Block Dress- 2

Yesterday I shared my first building block dress
Today I'll be sharing the other dress I made with different customizations.

This dress has an empire waist and a tie for a bow.  It also has cap sleeves.


It has a box-pleated skirt and in-seam pockets which show a fun peak-a-boo of fabric from sister's dress.


She looks so lovely in her cute dress. 


And here's the girls being so cute together. This picture was taken Easter Sunday morning.



Next week I'll be sharing one more dress I've made using the building block dress.  
With so many features, the possibilities really are endless.

September 20, 2016

The Olive + S Building Block Dress Book

Have you heard, Oliver + S just published a new book?


The book is really amazing. 
 It shows you just how to take her building block dress and modify it to design the exact dress you are wanting to make.  She gives you all the tools to essentially make up to 6,000 + different types of dresses. The book teaches you how to do so many different designs and guides you through each step of the way.  I have loved using it and exploring dress making in such a creative way!


Several months ago I was contacted to see if I'd be interested in testing for the book.  Of course, I was so thrilled!

I modified the dress to have an external hem facing (at the neck) and a gathered skirt.


I chose tulip sleeves (my favorite) and gathered-edge pockets. 


Here's the look on my dear girl. 


I love these huge buttons in the back.

She's a big fan of pockets.




Today Oliver + S is sharing the other looks the other pattern testers made.  Be sure to check it out!

 Come back tomorrow where I'll share the other dress I made with this book.


September 12, 2016

Make Your Own-- Easy- Skeleton Costume.




Each year for Halloween we kind of discuss our costume plans and some years we do a theme and some years I let the kids be whoever they want.  Both are fun.  Last year each of the kids decided to do their own thing.  I love how their costume choices were a perfect reflection of their personalities.

This girl wanted to be a spooky skeleton  Remember this was the one that wanted to be a scary bat when she was three.  She's such a crack up!

In the weeks leading up to Halloween, I'll admit, I saw very similar costumes all over town for like $20.  But I win, because my only out of pocket cost was a $3 t shirt.  Everything else I had on hand. And you know me, I really Love making the kid's their Halloween costumes-- even if it looks like I bought it.

Here's how to make your own!

MATERIALS:
1. Freezer paper (found a grocery stores)
2. White and Red Tulip brand fabric paint
3. Long sleeve black shirt
4. Black leggings or sweats
5. Sponge brush
6. Iron
7. Print out of Skeleton Bones


STEP ONE: Print out the Skeleton Bones pages and trace the bones onto the non-shiny side of the freezer paper.


STEP TWO: Cut out the bones from the freezer paper. 
 Place cardboard in between the shirt and pants for extra protection.
Iron the bones stencils in place on the shirt and pants for about 30 seconds or until you have a good seal.

STEP THREE: Once cooled, paint all the bones with the white fabric paint.  Wait until dry (about an hour) before adding more coats.  I added about three coats of paint. 

STEP FOUR: Once the paint is completely dry, remove the freezer paper.  I used an exact-o knife to help get around the tiny designs. 

 STEP FIVE: Add the red heart!  For me, I just free-handed the red heart.  But I added a heart in the pattern if you're not as comfortable free handing it. 

STEP SIX: There were a few parts where my paint bled through. ( Maybe it's because my freezer paper is old?  Or maybe I wasn't careful ironing every down well enough??) I'm not sure why.  But it was an easy fix.  I just went back over the areas with black fabric paint and fixed it up.

 STEP SEVEN: Once everything is completely dry and looks how you like it-- place it between a towel and iron everything down for about 30 seconds. 
 All done!

Who girl!  


As a special request from her, I made her felt "bone weapons".  

And just to be cute, I made a bone for her hair.
  

 I requested one cute smile picture.


Then it was back to being a fierce skeleton girl!